French-Canadian Heritage Society of Michigan
P.O. Box 1900, Royal Oak, 48068-1900
Medical Issues, DNA, and mtDNA
 
Articles:
The Founder Effect in Québec, by Susan M. Colby – this article was originally published in the October 2010 issue of Michigan’s Habitant Heritage
 
 
Articles about Catherine Pillard or Le Plat, wife of Pierre Charron
Catherine Pillard – A King’s Daughter, of Algonquian-Siberian Origin, born in France about 1651 – What is wrong with this picture,  by Raymond F. Lussier, Thomas King-McMahon, Johan Robitaille – This article was originally published in the April 2008 issue of Michigan’s Habitant Heritage
 
Catherine Pillard, Native of La Rochelle, In Search of the Truth¸ by Suzette Leclair, Algonquian-Wendat, SFOHG Toronto, Gail Moreau-DesHarnais, SFOHG La Pionière du sud-ouest and FCHSM Member, Johan Robitaille, Algonquian-Wendat, SFOHG Toronto.  The article was originally published in the April 2009 issue of Michigan’s Habitant Heritage
 
Time Line on Catherine Pillard, circa 1647, 1649, 1651, 1654 – 1717, by Gail Moreau-DesHarnais.  This article was originally published in the October 2010 issue of The Charron Association Newsletter
 
DNA Updates of Interest, by Susan M. Colby – This article was originally published in the April 2014 issue of Michigan’s Habitant Heritage
 
 
DNA Update – Catherine Pillard, by Susan M. Colby – This article was originally published in the July 2015 issue of Michigan’s Habitant Heritage
 
The Association des Charron et Ducharme has adopted a formal position on the origins of Catherine Pillard. You can read their position on their website: http://www.charron-ducharme.org/index.php/en/catherine-pillard-en/87-catherine-pillard-s-origin
 
Readers are also invited to read the articles by Suzette Leclair (http://www.geninfo.org/Pillard/DNA.htm), (http://www.geninfo.org/Pillard/index.html), (http://www.geninfo.org/Pillard/DNA-Genealogy.htm) one of the co-authors of the 2009 article.
 
Internet links related to DNA, and mtDNA:  FCHSM does not endorse any of the sites that sell DNA or mtDNA tests, however these sites often provide glossaries and information that may help you understand more about these tests and their results.
 
Wikipedia - Unlike articles in a printed encyclopedia, Wikipedia articles are ever-evolving.  As of 5 March 2018, their page on DNA contains 217 footnotes, as well as links to related topics.  See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA
The Genographic Project (a subsidiary of National Geographic: a glossary: https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/glossary/see-all/
Family Tree DNA: This company has organized mtDNA results for French, French-Canadian, and Native American female ancestors.  The link to the table is organized alphabetically by surname.
Their "undersanding results page for mtdna" answers questions about mtDNA: http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/answers.aspx?id=10 
 
See the Acadian and French-Canadian Ancestral Home site for information about the mtDNA results for the Founding Mothers of Acadia .Stephen A. White, the noted author about Acadian families, wrote the introductory article as well as verifying all of the lines of the individuals tested.  See: http://www.acadian-home.org/frames.html
 
Specific discussions of DNA results for Native Americans:
National Institute of Health article about genetic variations in Native Americans: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2082466/pdf/pgen.0030185.pdf 
Wikipedia article about genetic results for indigenous peoples (Native Americans): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_Amerindian_genetics
 
Louis Hebert - Loraine - May 2013
Loraine DiCerbo’s May 2013 Photograph of the Louis Hébert Statue - Louis Hébert was an apothocary - you can read his biography at the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online: http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/hebert_louis_1E.html